Lubricant use during intercourse and time to pregnancy

Over 70% of men and women report using sexual lubricants “makes sex more comfortable” and 45% of women and 50% of men say their use makes orgasm easier((Reece, M., Herbenick, D., Schick, V., Sanders, S. A., & Fortenberry, J. D. (2014). Men’s use and perceptions of commercial lubricants: prevalence and characteristics in a nationally representative sample of American adults. J Sex Med, 11(5), 1125-1135. doi:10.1111/jsm.12480))((Herbenick, D., Reece, M., Schick, V., Sanders, S. A., & Fortenberry, J. D. (2014). Women’s use and perceptions of commercial lubricants: prevalence and characteristics in a nationally representative sample of American adults. J Sex Med, 11(3), 642-652. doi:10.1111/jsm.12427)). Yet, less than 20% have used them in the last 30 days. One reason for not using lubricants is concern they may impede conception.

Occasional vaginal dryness is reported by most couples trying to con-
ceive, perhaps because of higher intercourse frequency, increased stress, and the lack of spontaneity often associated with timed intercourse.
Summary from BJOG…
Lubricant use during intercourse and time to pregnancy

Researchers assessed the extent to which lubricant use during intercourse correlates with time to pregnancy (TTP) via two continuing prospective cohort studies of pregnancy planners in Denmark (2011–2017) and North America (2013–2017). They categorized self-reported lubricant use as water-based/not pH balanced, water-based/pH balanced “fertility friendly,” silicone-based, oil-based, or a combination of these. At baseline, lubricant use was reported in 17.5% of participants, most commonly water-based/not pH balanced. Outcomes revealed no correlation of lubricant use with reduced fecundability in the preconception cohorts of pregnancy planners studied.

Summary from MDLink

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